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Man smiling at camera with his t-shirt sleeve rolled up to showcase the bandage on his arm, where he got a vaccine shot.
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PREVENTION and
PROTECTION 

Prevention - Vaccination

When properly administered before or after a recent mpox exposure, vaccines can be effective tools at protecting people against mpox illness.  Your local health department and healthcare provider office should be able to provide you with the mpox vaccine. 
Man smiling with his arm wrapped around the second man’s shoulder, with his arm handing onto the second man’s chest.
Man smiling at camera with his t-shirt sleeve rolled up to showcase the bandage on his arm, where he got a vaccine shot.

CDC recommends vaccination against mpox if:

  • You had known or suspected exposure to someone with mpox
     

  • You had a sex partner in the past 2 weeks who was diagnosed with mpox
     

  • You are a gay, bisexual, or other man who has sex with men or a transgender, nonbinary, or gender-diverse person who, in the past 6 months, has had any of the following:

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Treatment 

The primary medication available for mpox treatment at this time is an antiviral called tecovirimat or TPOXX, and it is primarily recommended for patients who are more likely to get severely ill, like patients with weakened immune systems. 

Managing your symptoms:

  • Medicines like ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) and acetaminophen (Tylenol) can help you feel better. Your healthcare provider may prescribe stronger pain relievers as well.

  • For rash in the mouth, rinse with salt water at least four times a day. Prescription mouthwashes, sometimes called miracle or magic mouthwash, or local anesthetics like viscous lidocaine can be used to manage pain. Oral antiseptics like chlorhexidine mouthwash can be used to help keep the mouth clean.

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